Tag: Mexico

Happy New Bowsprit :-) and Clean New Look

Dazzler’s Bowsprit project part two.

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Sanding the surface and preparing for painting

After all parts removed were cleaned and/or painted, the process of re-installing parts back onboard began. While the bow pulpit was off and being cleaned, Jilly discovered a crack and hole on the lower aft corner. That was sent off to a welding shop for repairs and was returned the next day. Thanks to Haracio in La Cruz for his valuable assistance. First I set the bowsprit on the bow and bedded it with 3M 4000 bedding compound.

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Clean Boat Bling and Cha Cha. The Sampson Post and Bowsprit strap were bedded and bolted into position.

Next was bedding the windlass and installing all of its cha cha. Next was starting to re-string the rigging. All was re-connected except for the Jib roller furling which needed its lower bearing replaced. This was a bit easier and a bit more difficult than it seemed. First the roller drum at the base of the foil came off easily. This allowed me be able to work on removing the large oil/grease seal from the bottom of the drum. The center shaft that the bearing rides on has a heavy duty circlip retainer keeping the bearing in place and preventing the shaft from riding upward. This little tidbit will be revisited later. The center shaft could then be tapped out through the top of the drum. After I cleared the shaft from the drum, another oil/grease seal and another circlip is visible and attached to the shaft. It is important to note that the two circlips on the shaft index the bearing placement on the shaft. I was able to locate the necessary replacement bearing and shaft seals locally here in the Banderas Bay area as the seals and bearings are standard type machine grade parts. There is a large circlip that insets against the interior of the drum against the outer ring of the bearing to index it against the drum housing. After removing that circlip, I was able to tap the bearing out of the drum. The ProFurl bearing and seal kit was somewhere in the neighborhood of $350 USD … if you can get one. The rigging shop in San Diego would not sell it to me because they have to be the ones that install it. I found all the parts I need here in the Banderas Bay area for approximatel $95 USD.

Ready to put it all back together, it went back together about as easy as it came apart. I recommend that you have some kind of heavy duty circlip tool for removal and re-installing the circlips. Those rings are very stout. Pack the bearing and the area between the seals with a good marine grade grease, but not too much. I used a straight probe carefully inserted between the shaft and the inner part of the seal to allow excess grease and air to escape while tapping the seal into place. I could now re-install the drum on the headsails foil. The forestay furler was attached allowing me to start tuning the standing rigging. Dazzler is starting to look like a sailboat again.

After tuning the rigging, we hoisted the staysail and furled it up. Next was the headsail. We hoisted it up with its halyard and I put the extra tug to set it in place. Now was the moment of truth. Did replacing the bearing correct the stiff roller furling of the sail? The answer was yes, but as I looked at the drum something didn’t look right. The lower shaft had pulled the top seal almost out of the top of the drum and was elevated about two inches above where it should have been. Knowing how the drum was put together, I knew that the lower circlip had some how failed. Which meant I had to de-tune the standing rigging, drop the Jib Sail and remove the roller drum, AGAIN, to take it apart.

Well, the culprit was the lower circlip was too thick and did not seat into the grove on the shaft, which allowed the shaft to slide upward when I loaded the forestay halyard. I had another circlip that was a few millimeters thinner and that was the end of that. BTW, I was able to find the heavy duty circlip at another tienda here in Mexico also. Lucky or just holding my mouth right I guess.

The double repaired drum was re-installed, the forestay roller re-attached, the rigging returned and the headsail installed again. All was good!

Everything is back together and working great.
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The Guiding Star. All cleaned up, polished and ready to Lead Dazzler onto new horizons and adventures.

As part of this bowsprit project I decided to replace the stainless lifelines with Dynema material. Since I had already purchased the Dynema line, I only needed a few end terminals, which I acquired at the local Marine chandlery in La Cruz. Two afternoons of splicing and the lifelines were completed. Dazzler’s stanchions are equipped with rings welded onto them to allow the line to easily pass through. I carefully marked those locations on the Dynema and spliced Dynema covers onto the lifelines. It turned out very nice. If attempting to do these cover splices, I recommend that you complete the first cover splice and then mark where you plan to make the next cover splice. I discovered that the splice reduced the length of the line by approximately one inch for each splice.

Spectra covers at wear points
Spectra cover buried in the Dyneema Line.

The Dynema was so easy to work with and splice. I was able to remove a few splices and move the splice to the correct location. I used about 16” of Dynema cover for each splice. I also stitched each splice with Dynema whipping twine to finish it all off.

Parts List for the ProFurl furling drum and life lines

Bearing FAG #16010, this seems to be a standard number with different manufacturers

Seal Dichtomatik #39395, 80x50x12mm

Regular 3/16 Dyneema line with a breaking strength of 6,500 pounds

Johnson products were used for termination points.

Isla Isabel…The Galapagos of Mexico – Part II

If you caught Part I of this story then you already know the beauty and splendor that is Isla Isabel. If you didn’t, you need to check that out. (Click Here for Part I) And yes, the shore adventure was spectacular to say the least. The birds and iguanas combined with the beautiful views would have been enough for me to say this is a place no one should miss but then no trip to Isabel would be complete without some snorkeling or diving in her magnificent, clear blue waters.

After our morning hike around the island we headed back to Dazzler to cool off and enjoy a cool, refreshing Pacifico or two. There’s nothing better than an ice cold beer after a hot and steamy trek through the jungle. We took a break, sat in the cockpit and enjoyed the views for a while. It was a wonderful day and we were the only ones in the anchorage. It was just us, the ocean and the wildlife.  There’s something so special about being in an anchorage when there isn’t another soul in sight. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again…it makes me feel like an ancient explorer. Well, let’s just leave my age out of this!

DW 12 IslandBeing able to see the all the fish from above was wonderful to be sure but we finally decided it was time to take a peek at the undersea world of Isabel.

With the monoliths less than a hundred feet from our stern we didn’t even need to fire up the dink. We just donned our lycra suits, grabbed our gear and jumped in the water. For those who aren’t familiar with lycra suits, we use them almost every time we go snorkeling. We had ours made in La Paz by a lady named Katty at the beginning of the summer. She charged about 800 pesos which at the time was about $40 USD. Not too bad for a custom made suit. They look like a wetsuit…only a bit more fashionable and the are made of lycra. They aren’t meant to provide warmth rather a thin layer of protection from jellyfish and other such stinging undersea creatures. I am allergic to bee stings and while I’m not certain if a jellyfish sting would give me the same reaction we don’t see any reason to take a chance. Also, in the Sea of Cortez there are these little jellyfish that look like tiny, floating, purple eggs. Their sting is extremely painful and it’s easy to swim into a swarm of them without even noticing because they are so tiny.k

Under the seaSuited up and ready to go we leaped into the water. WOW! That was really nice. First a few frosty cold ones to chill our insides and now a splash in the water to cool the outside. Yes, this was shaping up to be quite a wonderful day.

The water clarity made for some amazing snorkeling around the monoliths. We saw trumpet fish, sergeant majors, parrot fish, a turtle and a host of other colorful sea creatures. One thing I did notice, however, is we didn’t see even one ray. In the Sea of Cortez you could hardly get in the water without running into a few or even a few hundred of them. The further south we’ve come the less and less of them we see.

Isabel is as beautiful and magical underwater as she is on land and I’m sure I could spend a lot of time telling you about how beautiful it was beneath the surface but then I’m not that good of a story teller so here’s some photos and a short video of our day here.

Watch Our Isla Isabel Video…Click Here

After our snorkeling adventure we showered and prepared for a spectacular dinner. Captain Dan jumped in the galley and made crab stuffed mushrooms with a balsamic, shallot reduction sauce. Oh yeah!

Yep, Isla Isabel will remain very near and dear to my heart! If you ever get a chance to see this place, do NOT pass it up! I promise you will not be disappointed.

Until next time,


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