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Want A Lift?

Okay boys and girls today’s lesson is about Water Lift Silencers. What in the world is that? Well, I’ll tell you Shouty. It’s that round thing under the deck behind your engine that helps the exhaust push the water out the exhaust port usually somewhere near the aft your your boat. It can easily be located when your engine is on and the water and gases are spewing out into your wake.

There are all kinds of lift silencers but this one is mine. Dazzler is fitted with a very old fiberglass style with both the exhaust in and out ports on its top. It is a cylindrical sealed can with an approximate 1.5” flange on its bottom for fastening it to a platform.

So what’s all the trouble with these things? Do they have a life expectancy? Can they go bad? If so, what causes them to go bad? I sum up these questions with our experiences over the last several days.

First, I’m not sure if this is the original lift silencer on Dazzler or not. I suspect so though. I have owned her since 2003, and she is now 32 years young. I knew where it was located, but honestly didn’t know much about how it worked or what to look for in the way of issues. One of the two previous owners had it installed or installed it themselves. When it was installed, the angle of the elbow that connects to the back of the engine apparently was modified from a 90° elbow to an approximate 30° down angle. During the modification process, as determined by the crack I found, a regular 90° elbow was cut to accommodate the needed angle and a putty similar to the Minute Mend that I used to make our emergency repairs was used to complete the modification. Perhaps the instant epoxy has a use life also. Years of vibration and almost 6000 hours on the engine had finally hit that magic age of disintegration. LOL How do I know these things?

Well, two days ago the engine stopped spraying water again. No big deal as we’re just putting up the sails again. We sailed through the rest of the night and into the next afternoon before I had to tackle the new water leak situation again. It seems that I missed this crack because I couldn’t see it during the second fix. Hence I pulled the entire silencer out of the engine compartment to better diagnose and attempt to fix ANY and ALL cracks this time.

I guess third time is a charm. After grinding the areas around the several additional cracks I found, I filled up the canister with water to see if it had any other leaks. It’s flat bottom is also fiberglass and is joined to the flange of the bottom of the canister. When it was installed. The installer drilled through the flange and into the mounting deck. This held it firmly in place but it also put eight screw holes into the flange that apparently should have been avoided as all eight holes leaked water. I’ll tell you how I tried to fix this issue later. While the minty flavored dog poo was setting up From the new application, I refitted the silencer to its mounting deck. I used some wazoo pipe thread sealer I found in Papeete on the screws before I inserted them and fastened the silencer down. Yes, I magically found all eight same screw holes without too much difficulty. Not bad for upside down blind left handed screwing. Actually, I used a Sharpie marker and marked one of the holes and as for the rest the silencer just kind of fit in place. Both hoses were connected as designed. We waited an extra 10 minutes for it to set before I fired up the beast. You’d have thought I was waiting for Santa to come down the mast or something. I was impatient so I found putting away tools occupied me for several minutes while I waited. We fired up the beast and tada! No leaks from the hose connection. Yay! The bottom of the canister was a different story.

As it turns out, one of my Diesel engine repair manuals by Nigel Calder talks a little about the water lift silencer. Apparently a back pressure 1.5 PSI is present to help force the water out to the back of your vessel. That’s good because I’m not sure I could seal it up for any more than that. Additionally, Mr. Calder recommends breaking lose your exhaust connections and inspecting the inside of hoses for excess soot, oil or anything else at least once a year. Catch it before the surprise of not working properly when you least expect it. It will be on my annual inspection to do list from now on.

To answer the question of what the life expectancy is would be like answering the riddles of the universe in one word. They may, but I would recommend routine checks while servicing your engine. You know hands on eyes on while it’s running if possible. I have to admit that this was not something on my radar of things to check. To make sure it doesn’t develop a crack like ours did for whatever reason, defect, installation or old age, I’ll be checking our new one during regular engine services in the future. I only look upon our repair as an emergency repair and yes, we will be getting a new one in New Zealand.

I write this for all my boating friends out there that at the very least ask their own questions. I wonder if mine might be leaking? Do I have one of those? Is it in good working order?

If this helps just one other person to avoid potential exhaust water lift silencer issues then right on!

Now it’s back to sailing in a cold, cloudy environment. We are less than 200 nautical miles from Marsden Cove Marina where we will check into Country with Customs, Immigration and Bio-Security. We have about 14 knots of wind out of the North on our port quarter, the seas are relatively flat and we’re making 7 knots. Hang on Grape Ape! He likes to be part of everything. What are you gonna do? Teenagers!

Cheers!

Captain Dan

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We’re Celebrities!

SV SuAn leaving Navatu Bay

After meeting the people of the village in Navatu Bay we were excited to visit more of these island villages here in Fiji. This is, after all, why we travel in the first place. So, this morning we hauled our anchors and set off to Nadi Bay which is just a short 20 miles or so away. We motored the entire way because there wasn’t even a whisper of wind. In fact it was so calm that it was hard to tell where the ocean stopped and the sky began but still it was a beautiful trip as we snaked our way through the treacherous reefs. I must be getting used to this whole reef business because the sphincter factor remained a cheery yellow the entire time. Either I’m getting used to it or I was so calm because SV SuAn was leading the charge and I knew that as long as we followed them they would hit the reef first. HA HA HA

We arrived in the bay shortly after noon and dropped our anchors in about 8 meters of very good holding sand and mud. There is a large reef that extends out from the shore so we had to anchor further out than normal which will make the ride in to the village take a bit. The good news is that it should keep the mosquitoes away from the boat. Most mornings and evenings we’ve had to put our screens in the companionway to prevent those nasty pests from attacking. We’ve been warned of Dengue Fever. Apparently in Savusavu they currently have 28 cases. For those who are asking, yes, you can get vaccinated against it but when we were in México and inquired about it we where told the shot would cost something like $1500 USD per person so we decided to take our chances.

Anyway, here we are in this most beautiful anchorage with a large village set on the northern shore of the bay. After enjoying a couple of anchor down beverages we set off to shore. As we approached the village there were several men in the water. One was riding a horse in the water and others were attending to a small fishing boat that was moored there. Everyone smiled and waved as we made our way to the beach.

Once on the beach we were greeted in a most grand fashion. There must have been fifteen young men in their twenties all waiting to greet us. Each shook our hands and told us their names and they all gave us such warm and welcoming smiles. One young man barely let us get on the beach before he was asking to have his picture taken with us. Yes, believe it or not, he had a smartphone and couldn’t wait to take a selfie with the Kepelangis. Of course we happily obliged.

One dear young man took the lead and led us up the narrow, muddy path to the village. This village looked much like the one in Navatu. The houses are made of corrugated metal and are small with openings for windows and doors but few actual windows. There were lines and lines of drying clothes and people milling about as well as the obligatory dogs. Each person we passed stopped to shake our hands and welcome us to their village. They all told us their names but of course we met so many people we can hardly remember them.

The young man led us to the home of the Chief. We are greeted by a very pretty woman dressed in blue floral clothing. Her skirt is navy and pale blue flowers and her top is white with royal blue flowers. It’s very common here in the islands for them to mix up the prints. She was very well put together with a pretty matching necklace and earrings and she asked us to come into their home. Another woman in her late twenties or so with two small children was also inside. We can only assume she is their daughter. She was so excited to see us that she was literally beaming and jumping about giddy with happiness.

We were instructed to sit on the floor as usual and Lutz was told to place our Kava offering in front of the woman in blue. Suddenly I thought we may be in one of the rare villages where the Chief is a woman but we were then told she is the Chief’s wife and that the Chief is out working in the farm but would be home later.  After some Fijian banter back and forth between the Chief’s wife and the young man who brought us there she tells us he will take us through the village to meet the Taraga Ni Koro. He’s the Chief’s first in command who will give us a tour of the village.

We were offered a Mango flavored juice. This put each of us on edge a bit as we were told by the Health Officials when we checked into the country that we should always drink bottled water. I watched as the young woman put a powdered mix into a used plastic coke bottle and then filled it with water from their sink. Unfortunately it is almost impossible to say no to these people and quite frankly it would appear rude so we all drank the orange colored drink and prayed no one would get sick. 

We learned that the village has around 260 people in 48 homes. There’s a school here that has 130 students of which many come from nearby villages. There are eight teachers at the school and from what we saw, they are mostly men. They have solar power as usual but they are only allowed to have power from 1900 to 2200 hours each evening unless a family can afford to pay for power. Most cannot afford it.

And while we asked many questions there were two that we asked that revealed rather shocking answers. We asked how many boats come into their bay and how many of the boaters actually come into the village. Shockingly we found that so far this season fifteen boats have anchored in the bay yet we were the first cruisers to actually come ashore to the village.

As I discussed in the last article, there is a custom that should be adhered to here in the islands. That custom dictates that as visitors we are to go ashore with a gift and ask permission from the Chief to anchor in their bays. The gift is typically Kava root but could be just about anything from sugar, flour, tea and rice to books or school supplies. The point is that you don’t just come here with this entitlement attitude. This is their country and their rules and customs should be followed. Furthermore, what is the point of cruising and visiting other lands if you don’t actually take time to get to know the people there?

The fact that so many cruisers come here expecting to take and do whatever suits them is not one that sits well with any of us. It, in fact, makes us all look like rude, selfish tourists. We’ve already seen in Tonga how this has made many of the Tongans not like the cruisers at all. Our request from any cruisers making their way through the islands is to please take the time to do what’s right and customary for the locals. They are kind and welcoming and you owe it to them to respond in kind and follow their customs.

After spending fifteen or twenty minutes with the Chief’s family we were led back out through the village with the young man who had led us up from the beach. As we walk through the village we eventually meet up with the Taraga Ni Koro. He welcomes us with a big smile and handshake. He tells us he will take us up to the school. Along the way each and every villager stops what they are doing and comes out to greet us. It’s hard not to feel like some sort of celebrity as we walk along.

Just before we reached the fence at the edge of the schoolyard we stop and they show us a small greenhouse filled with saplings from a tree of which, I apologize, I can’t remember the name. They grow these trees for the seeds they produce. These reddish purple colored seeds, when crushed, produce an oil that is used in perfumes. This, along with fishing is what supports this village.

The next stop is the school. It sits on the top of the hill and is rather large compared to those we’ve seen in other villages. Of course with 130 students it has to be large. As we enter through the gate the first thing we see is a large field used for athletics. To the east end is a very torn and ragged volleyball net and it’s just near that edge of the field where there is a small building that houses the kindergarten. This is where we are led first.

The teacher here has twelve students who come to school from 0800 to 1200 each day. It’s a very small building but she has it nicely decorated for the children and just as you’d see in any school anywhere, there is artwork on the walls that was created by her students. There are three children there who are excited by our presence and begin coloring for us.

Top Left is the kindergarten teacher with three of her students. To the right the men sit outside of the kindergarten discussing the village. Bottom left is Lutz, Gabi & Dan with some of our wonderful hosts. The man in blue is the Taraga Ni Koro.

The children from the big school are let out for recess as we are at the kindergarten. Before we know it there are children covering the field. The boys are playing rugby and the girls are playing volleyball. All of them are constantly stopping to stare at the four white people at the edge of the field. Along the way up to the school Dan stops to play a little volleyball with the girls. They all giggle as he and the Taraga Ni Koro join in their game.

Further up the hill is the main school. Here we are greeted by two very nice gentlemen. One is named Mac and again, sorry, but I don’t remember the other’s name. By this point we’d met well over fifty people. We spend a half hour or so talking with them about the village, schooling and the challenges they face. One of their biggest needs is books for the children. These could be any sort of books, dictionaries or textbooks or even books meant for casual reading. They asked if we have anything like that on board which unfortunately we do not. We did tell them, however, that we will be coming back this way next year and will do what we can to bring supplies and books to their village. After all, they have all been so kind to us. If we can bring some supplies to help them, we would be honored to do so.

After our school visit we head back down through the village. Once again the villagers stop what they are doing to come out and talk with us. They are really too kind. Just as we are about to the end the of the village tour we come across their vorlo (meeting house). It is brimming with activity. Women are scurrying about like ants and it’s obvious something big is taking place. One woman asks me to come inside and take some photos and wow, what a treat! As I walk through the door of this long building there are women sitting on the floor on either side of the doorway. In front of them are several very large pots. Each is filled with some type of food I’ve never seen before. The only thing I recognize is fish and it’s small fish approximately six inches long. It looks just as it did when it was fished out from the ocean. It is whole and their glassy eyes are looking a bit frosted over.

The women at the pots are scooping the food onto plates and passing them to others who are then placing the plates on the long mats. It’s a well-oiled machine even though it appears a bit chaotic to an outsider. Around the edges of the room there are men sitting and even sleeping on the floor as they await the feast that is about to be served to them.

Back outside a mob of school children have found us and are all clamoring for our attention. They all want to have their photos taken. Once you take photos they immediately want to see them. I’m not sure if it is the feast about to be served or the spectacle of us but more and more villagers begin to arrive. We met one particularly well-spoken man, Benjimi, who has been in the village for several days. He and his group are evangelists there to preach to the villagers. He asks us to join them in their feast, however, the tide is dropping quickly and we need to get back to the dinghy and get out before we have to carry it across the huge reef so we thank him but politely decline.

The young lady in blue is Gracie….my helper!

It’s time now to leave these wonderful people so we are led back down the hill to the shore. When we reach the muddy, somewhat slippery part of the path I comment to Dan that I hope I won’t fall. Before I know it a lovely young lady, Gracie, about eight or ten years old, grabs my left hand and begins to escort me down the path. She looks up at me with her beautiful brown eyes and infectious smile and says, “Don’t worry, I won’t let you fall.” It’s at this moment that I realize I have reached the age where children actually think of me as elderly.  Thankfully I’m too happy to dwell on that fact now. I’m sure there will be plenty of time for that later.

By the time we reach the shore there are probably twenty-five children and a half a dozen men there to see us off. They help us to push the dinghy out and we say our goodbyes and thank them all for the wonderful visit to their village. As we pull away the entire crowd is yelling, “moce”and waving. It is a scene I don’t think we will ever forget and I wonder as we are leaving if the cruisers who just anchor in these bays and refuse to visit the villagers really know what they are missing. 

How could you not want to come ashore and visit these amazing people?

Until next time,

Jilly & Dan

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And We Have Arrived

Ni sa yadra (Good Morning) from Fiji!

We arrived in Savusavu at 0630 this morning. We were unable to enter the anchorage until 0800 as we had to wait for the marina to open and provide instructions. It was overcast so we didn’t get the amazing sunny pics we hoped for but we’re sure they will come. Of course it’s even gorgeous here in the rain!

At 0800 we contacted the Copra Shed Marina via the radio. They had us take a mooring and wait for a call from them to pick up the officials. We dropped Sparkle into the water to prepare to pick them up and when the call came around 0930 Dan headed to shore. The first group on the boat was three agents from Health. Unlike the drones who work public jobs in the states, these agents were a lot of fun. We laughed a lot while they were on board and they even let me take pics of them.

Health check completed without issue and Dan was off to take them back to the marina and pick up more officials. Next up, Biosecurity and Customs & Immigration. Three more wonderful Fijian officials boarded us and completed a mountain of paperwork. Again, they all had wonderful personalities and a great sense of humor. All of the officials made this process very easy and painless. It was a nice change from some of the other countries we’ve visited. Thank you to each of you!

All in, the process on board took about an hour and a half. Next we proceeded to phase two. We had to go into town and pay everyone because we didn’t have exact change and they don’t carry change. For any cruisers coming to Fiji, try to have exact change for the officials. It will save you some steps. Either way it was still pretty easy. All fees combined totaled $248.50 Fijian or about $115 USD. Not too bad really. Every place is within walking distance and after four days at sea it’s good to get walking again.

Once the boarding was complete Dan and I headed to town to get some provisions and make the proper payments to the authorities. We also had to work on getting our cruising permit. That required paperwork to be given to the marina who then faxes it to the appropriate authorities to get the permit. Once they receive it back you have to take it back to the Customs & Immigration Office where they will officially sign off on it. As we travel around Fiji we are required to submit movement reports each week saying where we’ve been and where we are going. They can be done via email or radio.

Savusavu is a very busy little place with people milling about everywhere. It was almost sensory overload at first. But, everyone is smiling and it is rare that you pass someone without them giving you a giant smile and saying, “Bula, Bula”! These people could possibly be the friendliest people we’ve met in all our travels. I also have noted that it’s a rather clean place. We saw lots of people working to clean up garbage and you don’t see much of it on the streets.

Once our business was complete we stopped at the Surf & Turf Restaurant for a couple of beers and a light lunch. We’ve been told their food is excellent and it surely did not disappoint. The owners are lovely Indo Fijians and we enjoyed talking with them while we were there. They even offered to allow us to use their dinghy dock whenever we come into town. That’s nice because its at the north end of town saving us a longer walk to get beer and groceries.

Off now to the Copra Shed Marina to check on our cruising permit. Prity, the lovely young gal in the office put a rush on it and she had it waiting for us when we arrived because it’s Friday and we want to take off for other anchorages on Monday morning with our friends, Lutz & Gabi of SV SuAn. Permit in hand we head to Customs where we are again greeted by smiling and very helpful agents. It takes just a few moments to get our clearance and we are headed back to the marina. Of course we’re here so we might as well have a beer.

As we are sitting enjoying our cold beverages we see our dear friend, Ernie of SV Patience. His boat is docked right out in front of the restaurant. We met Ernie in México and have seen him all along our travels. The last place we saw him was in New Zealand. It really is nice how cruisers seem to meet up in ports all over the world. We invited Ernie to come sit and have a beer with us while we caught up on each other’s adventures. When cruisers first get together the main topic of conversation is what has gone wrong since you last saw each other. We talked of our gooseneck issue and he told us of engine troubles and sail problems. I guess we all like to hear the other person’s woes as it makes ours seem okay.

From here it was time to start getting ready for an evening aboard SV SuAn. Lutz & Gabi made a point to come back here to meet us so we can do some cruising together and to celebrate our arrival they invited us to sundowners and dinner. And what a wonderful evening it was for all of us! They cooked us a fabulous dinner of steak, salad, grilled veggies and homemade bread. We shared rum drinks and had an evening full of laughs and great conversation. It sure is good to see our dear friends again. Looking forward to our weeks of traveling together.

So far, we love Fiji and can’t wait to see more. Keep checking back to see what adventures lie ahead for the crew of Dazzler.

Until next time,

Jilly & Dan