Isla Isabel…The Galapagos of Mexico – Part II

If you caught Part I of this story then you already know the beauty and splendor that is Isla Isabel. If you didn’t, you need to check that out. (Click Here for Part I) And yes, the shore adventure was spectacular to say the least. The birds and iguanas combined with the beautiful views would have been enough for me to say this is a place no one should miss but then no trip to Isabel would be complete without some snorkeling or diving in her magnificent, clear blue waters.

After our morning hike around the island we headed back to Dazzler to cool off and enjoy a cool, refreshing Pacifico or two. There’s nothing better than an ice cold beer after a hot and steamy trek through the jungle. We took a break, sat in the cockpit and enjoyed the views for a while. It was a wonderful day and we were the only ones in the anchorage. It was just us, the ocean and the wildlife.  There’s something so special about being in an anchorage when there isn’t another soul in sight. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again…it makes me feel like an ancient explorer. Well, let’s just leave my age out of this!

DW 12 IslandBeing able to see the all the fish from above was wonderful to be sure but we finally decided it was time to take a peek at the undersea world of Isabel.

With the monoliths less than a hundred feet from our stern we didn’t even need to fire up the dink. We just donned our lycra suits, grabbed our gear and jumped in the water. For those who aren’t familiar with lycra suits, we use them almost every time we go snorkeling. We had ours made in La Paz by a lady named Katty at the beginning of the summer. She charged about 800 pesos which at the time was about $40 USD. Not too bad for a custom made suit. They look like a wetsuit…only a bit more fashionable and the are made of lycra. They aren’t meant to provide warmth rather a thin layer of protection from jellyfish and other such stinging undersea creatures. I am allergic to bee stings and while I’m not certain if a jellyfish sting would give me the same reaction we don’t see any reason to take a chance. Also, in the Sea of Cortez there are these little jellyfish that look like tiny, floating, purple eggs. Their sting is extremely painful and it’s easy to swim into a swarm of them without even noticing because they are so tiny.k

Under the seaSuited up and ready to go we leaped into the water. WOW! That was really nice. First a few frosty cold ones to chill our insides and now a splash in the water to cool the outside. Yes, this was shaping up to be quite a wonderful day.

The water clarity made for some amazing snorkeling around the monoliths. We saw trumpet fish, sergeant majors, parrot fish, a turtle and a host of other colorful sea creatures. One thing I did notice, however, is we didn’t see even one ray. In the Sea of Cortez you could hardly get in the water without running into a few or even a few hundred of them. The further south we’ve come the less and less of them we see.

Isabel is as beautiful and magical underwater as she is on land and I’m sure I could spend a lot of time telling you about how beautiful it was beneath the surface but then I’m not that good of a story teller so here’s some photos and a short video of our day here.

Watch Our Isla Isabel Video…Click Here

After our snorkeling adventure we showered and prepared for a spectacular dinner. Captain Dan jumped in the galley and made crab stuffed mushrooms with a balsamic, shallot reduction sauce. Oh yeah!

Yep, Isla Isabel will remain very near and dear to my heart! If you ever get a chance to see this place, do NOT pass it up! I promise you will not be disappointed.

Until next time,

Jilly

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